Everything Falls Away

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magicalnaturetour:

Photographer Tien-Chien Chen :)

magicalnaturetour:

Photographer Tien-Chien Chen :)

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books-examiner:


First Class Passenger List … S.S. ‘Titanic’ … Wednesday, 10th April, 1912
First Class Passenger List presented here was found on the body of Herbert Cave, a saloon steward on the Titanic.

Medical Examiner, City of Halifax and Town of Dartmouth Nova Scotia Archives RG 41 vol. 76 no. 218

books-examiner:

First Class Passenger List … S.S. ‘Titanic’ … Wednesday, 10th April, 1912

First Class Passenger List presented here was found on the body of Herbert Cave, a saloon steward on the Titanic.

Medical Examiner, City of Halifax and Town of Dartmouth Nova Scotia Archives RG 41 vol. 76 no. 218

(Source: book-examiner)

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(via mudwerks)

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website

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mariamaria11:

journey to the past

mariamaria11:

journey to the past

(via themagicfarawayttree)

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Edible, adj.: Good to eat, and wholesome to digest, as a worm to a toad, a toad to a snake, a snake to a pig, a pig to a man, and a man to a worm.
Ambrose Bierce (via comendoemlondon)

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sisterwolf:

Queen Guinevere’s Deathbed  - N. C. Wyeth

sisterwolf:

Queen Guinevere’s Deathbed  - N. C. Wyeth

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(Source: itsneezy)

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nythroughthelens:

Urban decay on Canal Street. Chinatown, New York City.
New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.
Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it).
When I came across this section of Canal Street initially, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life.
A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory.
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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page
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Buy “In Another Place and Time - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Urban decay on Canal Street. Chinatown, New York City.

New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.

Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it).

When I came across this section of Canal Street initially, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life.

A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “In Another Place and Time - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

(via beautiful-portals)